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What Diabetes Taught Me About Leadership

Nov 30 | 3:30 PM

Jazz Sethi, the Diabesties Foundation's Founder and Director, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 13 and was the first person in the country to use a Do-It-Yourself Artificial Pancreas (DIYAP). Let us hear what this chronic condition taught her about leadership and how she made lemonade out of lemons.

hi dear friends uh welcome to this late night netflix session today with jeff and uh in a couple of minutes but i i just like to thank uh all of you who are present here and uh all our metrics users for uh the continued support and a lot of feedback which you all have been sharing with us and for uh being great users and yeah we have jazz here so we generally uh one of the uh things that we hope to maintain uh with netflix as we grow is to uh stay very punctual and you know being punctual is being respectful to uh the guest and the audience so we'll start right away uh anyway you know in in the first couple of minutes uh we're warming up so even if people join in in a couple of minutes they wouldn't have lost much so good evening dear friends thanks nivedita for setting this up and thank you all for being here today uh i'd like to just quickly introduce our guest jazz city today and then uh you know give it to her to hear her story uh jazz is a very multi-uh faceted person she is a performance artist she's a dancer the identity which precedes her is that she got diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 13 and as is the case uh with diabetes type one it strikes early and it strikes at an age when you are not even able to make sense of uh what it is so uh we'd really like to hear from jazz's we go ahead on how a child uh makes sense of uh diabetes and and you know uh would love to hear her lived experience for us diabetes type one uh is a disease it's a topic uh it's a type of diabetes but how is it uh for uh for a very young person uh uh to go through it how how bad is it or it isn't uh right so uh would really love to hear your story uh uh but before that yeah so just she when she was 13 and when she was diagnosed i think the identity which uh she was well known was she was the daughter of lead seti uh a world champion in billiards her mother is a very well known educationist but in the next decade and more i think she's cowed out an incredible identity for herself with her work in the field of diabetes she's the founder and director of diabetes foundation very interesting name uh would love to hear the story there uh so jazz let's uh let's start with you know the the coming to terms with it so when did it strike when did it sink in and how has this whole experience been and also you know the you know that the audience here is all doctors um so it would be great for uh people to get a uh insight into a patient's journey the uh you know it'll be great for us to be able to empathize with what actually uh a patient goes through on the day-to-day and what would uh what are some tips purely from a clinical perspective uh which you could share with our doctor friends uh things which work things which didn't work so love to hear from you guys thank you thank you so much i hope i'm honorable um and a big personally a big thank you to you and to the entire netflix team for the invite um so yeah if talking a little bit about my journey uh so as rightly pointed out i was diagnosed when i was 13 years old and i'm sure all the doctors who are watching this know uh the symptoms are very sudden and very um abrupt so i was losing a lot of weight i i lost about seven kgs in a week i was drinking a lot of water constantly going to the bathroom and you know at the time when i was 13 this is about 2009 you know we had a girls team i was in the eighth grade i was in the seventh grade and we were practicing for a football match and my parents and me kept sort of saying that okay i'm drinking water because we're doing like six hour practice sessions or i'm losing weight because i'm always running around so it was and you know back then none of us knew what type of diabetes is i think a lot of people still today just know that diabetes is diabetes doesn't happen to kids it happens to older people uh if you're overweight this that you know so and then after like a week or two it was getting really bad my mother and my father being indian parents called up the family doctor and said okay this is the symptoms what should we do and it was just said that okay get a blood test get a urine test and we'll see what it is so the blood test in the urine test went directly to my doctor and he just called up my father and said take her to the emergency room right now her sugar is 900 so we rushed to the emergency room and i was very much conscious still at the point though i was in a very very severe dka but i sort of walked into emergency and the emergency doctor was like why have you come and my dad was like okay you know the doctor has said that her sugar is 900 so we've brought her and he refused to believe it he's just like it's not possible if her sugar was 900 she would be in a coma by now and they were like there has to be some mistake at the lab so let's do like a recheck so of course i was extremely dehydrated so they started off with the iv fluids and all of that they got a blood test done against in the kuch gerber hoga in the lab when the results came back it was 1050 my blood glucose and they were shocked and immediately my endocrinologist was called and it was a declaration that she has type 1 diabetes now again for a 13 year old i had no understanding of what type 1 diabetes was i knew of diabetes because my grandmother has type 2 diabetes so for me it was always dadi koha diabetes how is it that i can have it but my father again because as you mentioned he is a sportsman he's an athlete and the first thing he told me was that okay jazz you have type 1 diabetes but vasim akram also has type 1 diabetes he's a top class athlete and i think it was more at that time for him to get some comfort than for me to get some comfort um because the understanding of a 13 year old or for any younger person is that you go to the hospital and you get cured when you come out of it that's the basic understanding we have health care and hospitals that you go in with a certain illness and they cure you and then you step out of it and that's what i thought you think we will stay for five six days doctors will do all the magic and once i go home i'll be okay it was only on the last day that my doctor sort of sat me down and said okay no this is a lifelong condition you need to take injections every day for the rest of your life this is not something that can get cured and that was the day that i broke down that was the day that i stopped and said i don't want this and i was crying and i told my mother okay i don't want diabetes um but then of course uh over the years and over the time it's it's grown to become a very big part of who i am and i i think what i keep saying and i've always said this in every single talk i've given is that type 1 diabetes gave me my purpose and as you mentioned that i am very much into performance i am by profession and by training i am a performing artist um and when i started diabetes it was when my passion which was performance and interaction and education sort of merged with my purpose and that's when diabetes started um but just to very basically say type 1 diabetes is not easy you know um and i'm sure all the doctors know that it's not an easy thing to live with there are things that are completely out of your control you could do everything right and still have fluctuating sugars um but you learn to live with it you learn to live with it you learn to live happily with it and that's the entire mission of diabetes to say that it's maybe a bad day with like skyrocketing sugars and really bad hypos but it's not a bad life and that's the support that we want to give to as many people as we can wow so uh thanks uh for that wonderful start uh we'll get to diabetes but jazz before that uh uh any uh you know you've been in the news uh earlier this year for uh being the recipient of what they call as diy pancreas i would love to hear more about it uh how it works and how how helpful has it been are there any criteria for what kind of patients is it suitable for uh but even before that how what what what clinical or non-clinical interventions actually worked for you and what is the best way for a patient with diabetes type 1 in the early to late teens to manage the stress of their school life their teenage life the hyper activity of that life uh physically and uh and the you know taking injections every day is a nightmare for anyone forget uh you know a childhood so what's the uh what are what were the regiments which you were on for the longest period of time and which kept your glucose in control so after i was diagnosed i was immediately put onto mdi so that's multiple daily injection therapy and my doctor right away put me on to basal and bolus which we know is the most effective form of treatment with type 1 diabetes um of course there's an element of affordability that comes here because we work with so many children in our outreach program and they're always on human or they're on mcstart or they're on nbh you know and we found that um it's like a very calm to allow kind of a treatment you know it keeps them not not even in range and we've seen that with so many kills so i was immediately put onto analogs i was on a basal and bolus for the first i want to say five six years and i was doing smbg which is self-punching blood glucose i would check my sugars uh yeah of course when it comes to school life it is difficult it is difficult to manage all the activity with it and i think it's very important for doctors to give stress on the fact that specifically when you're entering your puberty when you're entering your teens there's so much hormonal fluctuation that your sugars and i tell this all the time that your sugars are affected by so much more than what you eat and that distinction is not made clear enough i touched what i had a doctor who was who i told my parents off the bat that she is going to have fluctuating sugars till she's 19 years old and that's normal so do not worry and that's what gave my parents some anxiety some relief from anxiety because i would eat the most perfect balanced diet i would bolus correctly for my meals and i would still skyrocket because of the stress because of the hormones because of everything else that your body is going through um i did get onto an insulin pump in 2014 or 15 so i i was one of the first people in india to get an omnipot so i have an omnipotent insulin pump and i still wear that and then in 2018 i got onto a cgm so i have the dexcom g6 um and then two years ago at a conference a very very senior doctor who's a great friend and a great advisor professor parthakar from the nhs in the uk sort of introduced me to diy looping so the diy looping artificial pancreas system is not a surgery firstly i want to make that very clear because it's been misquoted multiple times so it's not a surgery it is a diy technology hack that you do so the person itself it's uh it's a very interesting story it's a patient driven movement called we are not waiting and it is when the patients challenge industry industry partners to say that listen you are not you're not advancing quick enough so we're going to take it onto our own hands and it was in fact the fathers some engineer fathers of some type ones in the us that devise this hack to say that how can we hack in the incident pump and the dexcom i mean and cgm to talk to each other to communicate with each other and to make it into an artificial pancreas almost so now and it's it's a whole diy thing there's it's not fda approved yet so um it's do it yourself very much in nature so you have to code your own app it's not an app that you can buy of the app store so so you have to have an incident pump you have to have a cgm and then you have to have a third party radio communication device that talks to them but what happens in effect is that when your sugars are dropping the insulin pump will suspend the incident like a normal pancreas would do if your sugars are rising the insulin pump will increase the basal rate or give you an automatic bolus to get it back into reach so it is a completely diy technological marvel i've been using it for two years my hba1c from 7.9 came down to 5.7 in 10 months without hypo's because and from 69 percent i went over to being 92 time in range so it is a technology that works um it's a little hard work because you have to do it yourself um a lot of doctors don't recommend it because they don't want to sort of have any kind of a liability but the nhs now is doing a closed loop trial they they're wanting people to get on to it as well talking about india there's a big question of affordability right so if you don't have a pump or you don't have a cgm it doesn't work so the mission is to make this technology accessible to as many type ones in india and get the benefit of it to as many people as possible so that's the regimen i am on currently i am on a diy loop system with the omnipod and the dexcom g6 and and where uh how many centers in india would be able to offer their patients an option like this it's not it's not offered you have to do it yourself the patient has to do it themselves so they have to have a pump and a cgm no doctor will do it uh since it's not fda approved so it is completely i mean it's completely our choice and we know that yes something could go wrong in the tech but we code it in ourselves there are about 30 000 people in the world currently using the diy system and your app is on your phone the loop app is on your phone um you control so i take my bolus from my phone i sort of manage my entire diabetes from my phone um and it's it's pretty advanced tech but so you have to code it in yourself there's a thing for android it's called android aps the thing i use is called loop it's for ios and there's something called open aps um so yeah it's a little so this is my little riley link so that's what i carry around with me uh and this communicates with my cgn yeah wow this is uh this is outstanding and i mean could not agree more with the we are not waiting movement uh yeah you know so the diabetes community or the parent community effectively told the scientific world that you're not innovating fast enough and uh we are done waiting and uh even after two years of this uh it's it's still uh unfortunate to hear that uh it's it's so complicated to quote and uh it's you know actually i i'm sorry if i've been received it's actually not that complicated and i'm not very tech savvy to be honest the beauty of it is that because there's so many patients involved uh the documentation is done so beautifully more of it is just copy this paste it here copy this paste it here right you know in xcode and it does its thing you know so if as long as you can follow instruction and if you can follow basic instruction a person like me who has zero experience in coding i am not tech savvy at all like i can do instagram that's all i can probably do but if i can code it in i'm sure anyone can and the beauty of it is it's connected to your apple watch so i can bolus from my phone uh from my watch so i can literally give myself an incident shot from my watch so it's it's made it so much more convenient uh when you're talking about day-to-day living um and you're absolutely right we are not waiting and the we are not waiting movement has actually challenged industry to move faster so now you've got tandem coming up with smart iq you've got the omnipotent horizon coming up with dexcom alliances and partnerships so it's really pushed industry to say that listen these guys are really not going to wait for us so let's sort of you know uh buckle up our shoes and go a little faster so incredible and we really can't wait uh to see this uh product available more mainstream so while while you say you just have to follow instructions it's uh it's still unfair i mean it's it's very very discriminating uh xcode how many people will have xcode and know how to use export so yeah it's uh it's just something which needs to be allowed uh and and encouraged a lot more so uh great uh jazz thanks a lot for sharing uh about the clinical side of what worked moving on to diabetes how uh how did it happen uh why did it happen and what's the mission of diabetes and and how far along it have you are you today so you know honestly when i was 13 and growing up i used to constantly go to youtube and you know type down type 1 diabetes on youtube and look for some interesting videos uh to educate myself about it and all i used to find and no offense to any doctor over here but all i used to find was doctors sitting and explaining type 1 diabetes and it was often like lectures and you know uh talks at conferences and stuff for a 13 year old that's not appealing right now i would love to sit and watch conferences all day long now that's my thing to do but as a 13 year old and as you very likely mentioned in the beginning the prevalence of type 1 diabetes is a lot more than younger kids that's why it used to be called juvenile diabetes so for a 13 year old i was looking for something fun and interesting that could educate me because again i think the biggest thing we're talking about technology over here being discriminating the the india does a very bad job with type 1 diabetes education i went to a fancy private hospital and i still was not educated about how to live with type 1 diabetes right and i i do not blame the doctors here at all because the doctors are already overburdened with so many patients a day they don't have the time to sit and a person will type one needs about an hour two hours in that hand holding period to talk about carb counting to talk about stress management to talk about sick day management to talk about hypo and hyper management to talk about stress and diabetes things like that we don't have the time so what is it abroad is that there are type 1 centers where there are diabetes educators there are psychologists there are dietitians there are counselors there are podiatrists all as a part of your diabetes team i never had that as well so diabetes education is fundamentally lacking in india and i can say that with absolute assurance of course there are a lot of centers trying and that's the mission eventually but like i was saying i used to go to youtube and find nothing 2018 i was like listen and but till 2018 till i started diabetes i don't know a single other person living with type 1 because it is of course rarer than type 2 in a country like india we have registered only one like 50 000 patients in india it's a much it's a very skewed number but still registered i was the only one in school living with type one none of my friends had type one none of my extended family had type one so it brings upon a very overwhelming sense of loneliness that when you feel that you're the only one having to inject when you're the only one having to count carbs and that's not the case there are other type ones out there but the concept of peer support was very much lacking back in 2018 so i said you know what let's start a youtube channel let's start a really fun youtube channel bringing in my performance history and saying making it fun and colorful and energetic and just smiling you know talking about diabetes while smiling and that's how it started with the youtube channel how that sort of then transcended into a proper registered foundation with so many projects was a journey that is absolutely organic and overwhelming but the diabetes foundation today caters to over 3000 type ones in india we have over 15 chapters in 15 different cities of india we do monthly peer support group meetings where we have it's called diameter we have the best time we just had a diameter on sunday the type ones come together they share successes we play diabetic games it's a lot of fun we have a huge outreach program where we talk about giving free insulin and education our education program which is called project kiran named after my mother is about creating unique content for type ones doing one-on-one counselings uh making education fun and the entire idea the mission if i have to sum up in one line is to make everyone with type 1 diabetes feel heard supported understood and celebrated and we try to do this with the different projects we have beautiful and i mean diabetes type one couldn't ask for a better poster person than you uh because when you say you know you need to see people smiling uh and talking about diabetes and you need to make them feel more regular in society right so looking at you i don't think anyone here feels that um diabetes is a you know like taboo or anything like that it's a handicap it isn't i mean it must be a tough uh tough task managing medications and stressing about hypos and everything but it's not a handicap you can do everything you want to and you travel a lot you do a lot of long distance long haul travel how do you manage long-haul travel uh jazz uh medically i'm actually leaving for a flight in like four hours so you know it's gonna be a 16-hour flight so this question could not have come at a better time so i always am a big believer of caring extras because once when i had gone to london as a kid i'd only taken one pen with me thinking oh i'm going for four days one pen should be enough pen froze midway and you know in when you're in a foreign country unless you have a prescription of a doctor over there they're not going to give you incident um so that was a big learning experience but i always carry extra so there's extra incident in my handbag in my check-in what if the check-in gets lost then you need you need to have something in your handbag carry a lot of snacks with me uh for the flight so my gluco gummies and my glucose tablets in case i get a hypo hydrate a lot i try not to eat too much airplane food because it's so packed with so many preservatives and calories it spikes my sugars so um it's just about sort of being prepared and sometimes being over prepared with type 1 diabetes isn't as being normally prepared you know so always carrying extras checking sugar as often as possible counting your carbs maybe carrying home meals i do that a lot so um like i said about preparation is better than cure prevention so preparation is better than cure for sure it almost seems like uh you know when you're talking about diabetes or thinking about it uh and when you're living with it you're almost playing a game uh it's like a sport for you uh how much of this comes from uh your father and and you know it it really very mathematical about these things so uh you don't look at them as issues or uh it just has to be done yes this inning has to be played out yeah and you're so right right because i think some somebody asked me once that how do you do it you know like how do you take so many injections a day how do you check your sugar how do you do it and i it was so natural for me to say you don't get to give up that that's not even an option you know people have an option to give up here there is no option you don't take insulin you die it's as simple as that so the question arises i'm sorry i don't know i don't sound grim but that's the reality of the matter and my father again because he's a sportsman he kept telling me and he constantly tells me that to be anything in life you need to first be obsessed and then you need to be disciplined so when you get obsessed with taking care of yourself and i don't mean it in like a you know over sort of a sense the idea of you obsess over being better every day you obsess over never giving up you obsess about being better and trying and then you be disciplined and that and i've learned that from my father i mean the man who sort of used to practice 10 hours a day uh let go of everything before a match you know that discipline and that is what is needed in type 1 also along with all the fun along with all the musty along with living life normally but that discipline and i think i keep saying that type 1 teaches you a lot more than it takes away from you you know it's taken away our ability to produce insulin but it's taught us so much it's taught us discipline it's taught us so much gratitude you know that um and it's taught us the the basic nature of our body that one tiny thing goes off balance it can tip the scales forever but the idea being that you know i keep saying that it's not a bad life yeah you can do whatever you want you become well clearly yeah as i said that there can't be a better advertisement for it's not a bad life than you uh very well said uh obsessed uh and disciplined because a lot of us will find ourselves either obsessed with something or very disciplined about it but i think uh it's very insightful uh yeah it's it's really insightful to look at it that way that uh just obsession uh is is probably not going to be enough in the long run it has to come exactly um you you touched upon this a couple of times when when you when you talked about obsession and discipline uh but coming to the topic uh for the day and uh this would be a great place to uh you know sort of bring this conversation to a close uh what has uh what are the five uh if if you were to come up with say five uh lessons leadership lessons management lessons which diabetes has taught you i would love to hear any stories or any anecdotes that you have around them yeah so um i think so like i keep saying i die but diabetes has taught me a lot and running diabetes has taught me a lot as well um i think one of the biggest lessons um and i tell this to my team all the time so my team of diabetes is 30 people and they're all living with type 1 they are chapter leads there are my head of community engagement head of outreach development um they're all type ones we have four healthcare professionals on our team also we have diabetes educators it's it's a fun team it's a young fun team but i think and i keep telling my team this over and over again is that moral authority over positional authority you know that's one of the biggest things where we do this program called back to basics okay and back to basics is a project where you can schedule a session with us um and it sort of works in partnership with doctors when doctors like we say we're never gonna titrate insulin that is not our job that is not our qualification we are not going to do that is unethical you go to the doctor you get your insulin sorted you get your prescription all that the doctor may not have time to sit with you and explain to you about you know all the other things like i mentioned so our team does that which is the back to basics you schedule a session with us whatever topic you have let's say card counting and you want to sort of have a session on card counting one of our ed will match you with an educator that is that's their strong point and you have a session you can spend an hour answer your questions the moral authority comes in over here to say that you can't preach what you don't practice you know if i tell another type one that you need to check your sugar 20 times a day but i only check it three times a day it doesn't work so my team vik i am not the best card counter i'll be very honest with you whoever the doctors are watching i always mess up my card counting and it's it's honestly i sometimes over correct or i take less insulin so my team also knows that no they will not give me a carb counting b2b to take because it's not fair it's not right um you know it happens many times i've heard so many stories where patients asked when the doctor said you know you need to check your sugar these many times a day why are you getting so many hypos you should be able to correct your high pose and this is happening with dr v mohan and i respect him greatly he's become a great ally and he's told me the story where the patient goes but doctor have you ever gotten a hypo you know do you know what a hypo feels like so i think the fact that and the entire work of diabetes comes from moral authority why we can be so confident in propagating the things we say is because we are living with those things so it is about modern authority and i get i keep going back to my team with the same thing so that you cannot go advise something that you don't do it's not right you know um and that sort of becomes the ethos of the foundation as well you got to watch the talk you do it's and it's easier said than done but when you live with something so uh you know potent you have to sort of be very conscious about that um and it requires a lot of honesty like like you said that you're not good at it so you should not get into it yeah absolutely it's okay to say that you don't know i mean all of us are learners right and we type on diabetes you have to be a learner all your life there will always be something new that comes that you haven't experienced before but you have to get on with it as you ever learn about this um and then another big thing about lived experiences that i keep seeing is so important um is a lot of the work we do around language when we talk about that there are names behind the numbers there are people behind the patients and there are stories behind the statistics uh there's oftentimes diabetes is clubbed into this statistical analytical kind of a vibe and the idea that a lot of people forget sometimes is that there are actual people who are living with this you know it's very easy to club us into a statistic it's very easy to club us into that five percent of diabetes but that five percent also has very very true stories very very rare stories and it's very important to respect that so uh we do a big piece on language matters we do a big piece and always talking about person-centered healthcare and um that's something that i just want to keep sort of putting back into the work we do as well um another thing is that again the diabetes is also started always start with the who and not the what you know um and i keep going back and this is what i've sort of learned from design thinking as well and my mother because she was from nid um is that keeping the user at the center whenever you're designing something whenever you're doing any kind of a project um it's about that user and the idea being that it's very easy for us to just design projects and put them into the world but if it's not solving an issue that we have discussed if it's not going back to the who then it is really not worth it because i can say today that oh i have this project from diabetes it's fabulous it sounds great but if it's not delivering any kind of impact that project is absolutely worth it uh worthless so the idea that always go back to the who and not just the what because that who is finally the person that's gonna use that what so it's always about like i keep talking person-centered person-centered that human-centric that who the user-centric design is very very important and a lot of the work we do is and in the things i've learned because i used to get very carried away i'd say this sounds very exciting but over the years it taught me that it's an absolutely it sounds great in theory but it's not helping anyone it's not changing anything then why are we so caught up on the glamorization of it no i think uh one one immediate thing which comes to mind is when you said the mission of diabetes is to make sure and i was thinking what it would be like i was thinking ahead of you uh abcd etc and you said to make sure every patient feels heard yeah i think there you have the who uh that's the who when when people are designing products and services and programs uh and all that probably is required a lot of times is just for people to be hurt so uh it's amazing that you put that first it was a list of three or four things heard uh celebrated empowered but yeah but heard is the first thing and which i think goes completely with this yeah brilliant um in the last two lessons i think and this is what diabetes and diabetes both has taught me is that talent is great but you require stamina at the end of the day and i think this goes back to our point of it being a marathon it goes back to my point of my father saying that obsession and discipline because obsession can be very short-lived you know i can be super obsessed with something but if i don't have the stamina to ensure that it's disciplined and it's the same with diabetes as well it's the same with living with diabetes it's not a sprint right it is a marathon i am going to live with this till i die if a cure comes great in the middle if it doesn't come then we are very much accepted and it comes with leadership as well that it's you know talent is great but if you don't have the stamina to power through with it it's again it's short-lived and i think what diabetes teaches us is that it it's the end goal that matters it's that long run that matters and keep again going back to the team with the same thing uh and then i think it's a i don't know if it's a leadership lesson or not but the idea of keeping the humor alive um you know keep the joy alive have a sense of humor even in your leadership we have team parties where we just sit and do no work and just talk about our sugar catheter sugar cat and we match our sugar because you're already living with something that is so bleak you're in the line of work where we hear disturbing stories every day of stigma of taboo of unaffordability of the fact that disparity is such a reality and i think to tie it up with the bow and say that you know what it's okay we're gonna get through this have that smile keep the humor alive um laugh at yourself laugh at that hypo that you had one day you know uh because that is what is going to get you through with that other thing as well um and then finally my last uh sort of lesson and again which i giving us a bonus lesson i'm giving you a bonus lesson and this is the lesson if you ask anyone in my team they will say this that it's not just about delivering outcomes it's about delivering impact and this is something that i've learned a lot from the work that we do with the nhs um in the uk the fact that i can deliver 40 outcomes a year i can deliver 40 projects a year and again what we talk about right the who that though it's not just about the numbers it's about the stories that when i deliver impact and it could be a small impact it could be one person change it could be one smile given it's a lot more worth it and the stories the messages we get was really helpful or that you know because of this we've gotten a month of incident or that you know yes i was not alone these stories are the true impact and i keep telling my team it's just not about outcomes outcomes can be manufactured and it can be manipulated and it can happen we can do a lot more outcomes also but the true success comes when you deliver impact and that's the mission of diabetes to deliver a sustainable meaningful and unique impact in the world of type 1 that was my two piece of wisdom [Music] yeah no it's uh um sort of speechless uh just trying to process what you said uh lots of good things says and i was just reading the comments uh i think people really appreciated it wonderful uh chat with you i think we could go on and on you have a flight to catch it for us thank you so much for still making time for this uh really appreciate it i think you you symbolize living life to the fullest and uh let me see if there are any questions uh i just saw comments i i actually didn't see questions um but just give me a second absolutely excellent session thank you so much just wow yes wow i seen her top all principles of public health patient support groups are the key to success absolutely i'm just reading out some comments for you so you just get that feedback here's one question what is your opinion on physiotherapy management in diabetic patients have you have you had to yeah i think a very personal example here i also suffer from coccyx adenia so my coccyx my tailbone is 90 degrees curved inside so my parents called me a monkey but literally my tailbone is i say 90 degrees inside so whenever i sit or anything there's direct pressure on the nerve so i did a lot of physiotherapy for my tailbone and it was very monitored with my sugars i did not see any kind of um a problem with my sugar management of course it's not an alternative to any kind of diabetes treatment but um it works hand in hand use i did sometimes used to get hypos post my physio sessions if it was a little bit more aggressive but as long as that is managed you check your sugar before you check your sugar after and it's fine sure um there's one question on did you get any side effects after using insulin for so many years and there are many more years to consume it there is no side effect of insulin this is a myth that we try to bust every single day of our life insulin is very safe it is absolutely perfect i've been typing for 13 years been using incident all my life it is what keeps me alive the only side effect is if you take too much you can get hypo that is all correct well very well said uh uh have you uh have you personally are you are you a yoga pranayama person or do you advise it have you seen it benefit patients of type 1 yoga does a lot to sort of stabilize your sugars and i have seen that i my head of outreach development is a huge yoga person he does it every single day his chart is absolutely beautiful but i think that that is true with any kind of exercise so what we say is that um you should do any kind of physical exercise 30 minutes a day because it increases your insulin sensitivity so it's not just about yoga i dance every day i do a lot of weight training as well strength training and that also helps my insulin sensitivity so the idea comes there yoga is beautiful it's not too exotic um it's great uh it's any form of physical and mental uh exactly exactly exactly how does uh how does diabetes type one go with pregnancy so uh we have a couple of type of just delivered babies also um it you do need to do a lot of pre-planning with your doctors with your gynax and uh get your hba1c down below a certain level before you conceive um and then there's a lot of monitoring we try to put all people with pregnancy who are type ones with a cgm so that the idea is you should be as much in range as possible for your health and the baby's health but it has to be consulted there are more sort of visits to your endo and your gynac when you do get pregnant but we've seen very very healthy babies being born with all our type 1 girls so it's very much possible it's very much doable if and when i get pregnant we will do this talk again we would love to uh have you here again uh there's a few questions uh but i i think somehow or the other you covered some of them uh i'd i'd just like to i would have loved to summarize the talk uh but i think we'll make the recording and the summary available for everyone so we can just save that time but i think lots of takeaways uh i'll just summarize the leadership lessons which you spoke about i think you started with moral authority being very important in anything you do you need to be the right person for the job it's all about empathy and putting people at the center talent is great but you got to have stamina i think that that was a very interesting one i think because a lot of battles in life are very long battles uh and that's something we probably don't appreciate uh and we sort of have a one-size-fits-all kind of a strategy whenever we embark upon a journey i think it's very important to understand that some are sprints and some are medicines and type 1 clearly is a marathon but also in life when you take up certain endeavors they're going to be marathons and uh stamina is going to outlast yourself and keep the joy i think uh again you you it's wonderful to see that you you know uh are a great example of most of the things you've said uh but keep the joy uh live live life uh to the fullest i think all of us um have our own type ones and yeah yeah it may not be type 1 diabetes but we all have our own type ones and many things which you've shared with us today would help us uh either to go and find a diy cure uh be more happy about it be more relentless about it uh we are not waiting is not a movement which needs to be restricted to diabetes it should be something which which we should uh latch on to whenever we're not able to find a solution or why should we wait for someone to come and give us a solution um and uh everything so i think uh this talk is obviously we learnt about diabetes but it's it's very inspirational uh because we'll all have our own uh challenges and i think many of this would be very helpful in taking us through so thank you so much as i think we we've about on time we thought we discussed maybe a 45 minute session uh i i i'm good uh if you have any uh parting comments uh and then we'll close no thank you so much for the invite it was a pleasure talking to you um and i hope that uh just the few things that we have said has resonated somewhere with someone in whatever way in whatever capacity if you don't want to check out any of the diabetes work you can just head on to all our social media it's all diabetes and um any questions again like i'm happy to take and a big thank you to you and i'm just going to end with what we say in all our youtube videos all our diamonds everything is just be type one of a kind that's all because you are everyone is like one of a kind beautiful and uh guys once you're back from the us and and whenever you have some time we'd love to have you again uh will probably talk about uh counseling uh patients uh of type one uh some of the things some of the toolkits you use in diabetes including diabetes uh like-minded people can join maybe everyone may not uh find it relevant but anyone who would like to join a little more on the non-clinical management of diabetes in children and teenagers we'd love to have a session on that so this is an invitation but we'll follow up once we're back yes thank you so much thanks everyone for for joining us today and good night thank you thanks

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dr. Jazz Sethi

Dr. Jazz Sethi

Founder & Director at The Diabesties Foundation

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dr. Anil Heroor

Dr. Anil Heroor

Head of Department - Surgical Oncology, Fortis Hospitals, Mumbai

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Dr. Rohan Desai

Founder & CEO, Medflix

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dr. Jazz Sethi

Dr. Jazz Sethi

Founder & Director at The Diabesties Foundati...

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dr. Anil Heroor

Dr. Anil Heroor

Head of Department - Surgical Oncology, Forti...

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dr. Rohan Desai

Dr. Rohan Desai

Founder & CEO, Medflix

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