00 : 00 / 05: 00 (Preview)

This discussion has ended. Watch the recording on Medflix app,

How AI is Shaping The Future of Well-being

Dec 21 | 2:00 PM

In recent years, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has risen to prominence for its practical applications in every industry. According to the WEF, the human-AI collaboration will usher in the fourth industrial revolution with potentially beneficial implications worldwide. Healthcare, in particular, stands to benefit immensely at all points in the value chain - from discovery to delivery. With the help of AI, the adage - prevention is better than cure - will become a reality for our society. The medical error rate, drug discovery pipeline, and diagnostic reporting stand to benefit immensely from the deployment of AI. Join us live as Dr. Marcus Ranney discusses the impact of artificial intelligence on the future of healthcare!

[Music] good evening everyone this is dr brushali from team netflix i welcome you i would like to introduce our faculty for today dr marcus running he is a business professional in healthcare and technology he completed his bachelor's of science and medical degrees from university college medical school london he has also worked as a medical officer in the royal air force at nasa's kennedy space center after practicing clinical medicine in london he made his transition to mumbai and since then has been working within the healthcare and life sciences industry is also known as the best-selling author keynote speaker digital talk show host and many more such adjectives he has been a world economic forum's global shaper and recently appointed as a senior fellow to the atlantic council he is now the founder and ceo of human age it's a data led venture bringing the science of performance and longevity into the workspace so i'm sure you're all looking forward to listen it right from him so i would hand it over to you dr marcus we can start now absolutely let's get going i'm looking forward to this conversation that we're going to have together yeah so how would you like what is the impact of digitization how would you like introduce or start off with um so firstly i don't have a presentation we're gonna have a conversation around this right yeah yeah yeah yes sir yeah yeah so you know i think um what always staggers me each time i see this data point is that every individual in the developer the developed world and we should include a lot of people who are signing into this as well is creating 1.7 megabytes of data every single second most of that data is being used to buy something you don't need watch something you don't want to watch date someone you don't need to date or eat something you shouldn't be eating less than 0.3 of that is actually being used to augment the human experience in terms of body and spirit and that's really the starting point of what we're trying to do at human edge i believe you know fundamentally that by christmas day of 2025 so just over four years time i can know you better than you know yourself just looking at all the data that you're creating around you if you look at young people today we've got a billion white-collar workers around the world half of them are under the age of 30. a third of them so 300 odd million people already own a digital device or are creating health data in some form that could be through a watch type device a wearable implantable a cgm mobile phones etc and what we haven't done at all in the healthcare profession is really leverage the power that's being created on the back of that to help drive people's behaviors extend health span reduce the severity of disease augment care and fundamentally i believe transform the way healthcare is accessed delivered and experienced around the world so that's our premise that's that's that's essentially what we're doing at human edge we've taken a very enterprise specific approach in that we work with large corporations to address the health and well-being needs of the employees but our goal very much over the next three to five years is start to work with insurance companies and healthcare providers like everyone signing in doctors themselves to make these types of products and platforms available to patients to free up your time and to augment the care and ultimately uh increase the the health benefit that people can receive right right true so i mean technology i think it can be used very well in patient tracking as well because i think the major problems doctor nowadays faces patient not turning for a follow-up or not at all coming for an opd visit or something so how would the ai help with that i think number one let's just separate the conversation between ai which is artificial intelligence versus the utilization of digital technology for healthcare there are many digital technologies available to us right mobile based applications being the simplest ones which are there of course you have hospital information systems and and and patient records emrs healthcare records etc that's another big trend etc i think too often the focus is too much on artificial intelligence and i think it's important for people and maybe from the healthcare profession as well to appreciate it's a spectrum there's structured learning which happens which is basically where data is being shared that data assimilation is then viewed in a way that rules can be created from that sharing of information then we get into machine machine learning which is where you then apply those rules and you enhance the efficacy of that particular learning algorithm and then it goes into more traditional or what's better thought about is artificial intelligence which is where then intelligence is created but that entire process can take years to get there so i think we shouldn't use terminology like ai too readily because honestly there's a lot that has to go in before we even reach that stage of um of artificial intelligence so really let's firstly look at how we can use technology to augment the experience of care i think the easiest one is accessibility and affordability we're living in a country where we just have too few medical professionals per population you look at a discipline like psychiatry which i think is the worst across the entire country there are less than 5 000 consultant psychiatrists in the country of 1.4 billion uh people and of course you can extrapolate that up to all kinds of other specialties as examples but they the the the lack of infrastructure the lack of personnel the lack of resources can be leapfrogged through the application of digital technologies and we've seen that come to such great advantage through the last 18 months 24 months where mobile usage of tele consultations have gone up by five six seven fold sometimes high almost twelvefold in the large metros uh in india mobile applications like arogyasetu which is one of the most downloaded apps ever anywhere globally over 120 million downloads uh since it was released uh so there's lots of advancements which we've really been catalyzed by the pandemic uh by uh having the right types of digital infrastructure and i think now the government creating the new health stack sort of building up on top of what it did with the adar system the biometric system and ayushman bharat or pmj making health care services available for people i think the new health stack was a step in the right direction i think what we need to do as medical professionals is enhance the health literacy so that the right people know where they can get the right tools to help augment their care whether that's in different vernaculars different languages different pair networks etc or provider networks etc these are all important things so people get access to these digital tools that are available so you know i think we've learned a lot as a profession in the last 12 to 18 months and now is when i feel we're reaching an inflection point uh wherein we have a global advantage to really be a thought leader and create products in india as we do at human age which can then be applied to other global markets as well right that i was just about to ask the same thing that uh i mean how was ai before the pandemic and after the pandemic because i don't think before pandemic so much use like you said the rok say to app the digitization even the vaccination certificates are digital and i am proud that it's only in india that's happening that we get a digital certificate so how has it affected like the pre pandemic and post pandemic i you know i i think um in terms of the numbers that i saw most recent it's a 8 to 10x increase in teleconsultation numbers uh because of the pandemic and as i said in metros it's even higher i think it's a 12x um uh increase in some of the metro so we've seen a lot of increase and i'm sure anecdotally most of the people on this conversation would have experienced that in some way as well yeah yeah yeah that's true so when it comes to ai like mostly in healthcare we would say that it's a i think more popular in the urban population how would we able to reach the rural population which is quite a large in number and i think they need it more than the urban population so i'm i'm gonna i'm gonna press you to change the question a little bit sorry i'm trying to charge my device at the same time so that we don't run okay or fuel yeah but yeah when you say ai has increased what exactly do you mean by that because remember uh ai is just one technology in this spectrum yeah yeah yeah that's true no like you said the like arugu say to app i mean it's such a simple app such i mean downloads are easy it has been downloaded many times but still just 120 million so to reach the remaining population what can be done what should be done for that oh so i think there are this is uh uh there are lots of different elements there's a multi-dimensionality to this right the first one yeah is really the understanding of um uh of technology in terms of access to to tech platforms um so you know india is is definitely a very tech friendly country when it comes to mobile phones wi-fi network etc so the broadband capability so that's something which need to be solved for uh in the uh in the in the access to data or the access to connectivity uh and uh and devices space um i think the second thing is is just getting users used to the idea of uh sharing information digitally and one of the closest comparables that i think we can look at is uh is the finance sector right because banking and finance is another industry where an intrinsic level of trust is required in order for you to do those transactions and that's similar therefore to what we are doing in the healthcare space uh as well uh so that's that's sort of the second piece i would talk about and i i think the third piece uh and i'm actually i've just pulled up the data i was actually i was underestimating tele health consultations in india have increased 38 times over the covet pandemic 38 times in india 85 of all doctors have now consulted with their patients via tele consultations eighty percent of them are first time users 44 of them are non-metro so this is incredible non-metro first-time users consulting patients using telemedicine 120 million are okay say to app sorry what was the download you were asking before i got sidetracked into the data so yeah yeah so that's the like right now you said about the non-metro city so that's an uh impressive statistics that we have so that's what i was saying that for this to reach i mean we are impressed how it has reached the non-metro cities i was thinking about what about the rural areas where there's very less i think internet i would say that jio and all have reached there but still without the internet and wi-fi how can we like actually boost ai again i'll say let's not focus on air let's let's look at digital health uh specifically but i think this is where you know the government has to come in right they need to lay the pipes in order for services to sit on top and you know amazon's amazon's founder jeff bezos wrote about this beautifully where he spoke about his type of business would not have been possible had the pipes of the internet not being laid down uh spacex founder elon musk talks about it very similarly with what he's doing he's really laying the pipes in order for new products and new services in the space industry to take off so i think that is the fundamental role of government is to create the right ecosystem to fuel digital innovation to fuel the uptake of services and for these things because no one else has really the mind even a large private organization uh such as jio um i mean they're probably the only ones who have anywhere near that sort of scale and capability but otherwise this is what government has to do it has to create the right id infrastructure the bandwidth the mobile telephone connectiveness the right tax incentives the right investment incentives work at state and center in order for these things to then be in a position that allows entrepreneurs healthcare providers uh insurance payer provide all the entire ecosystem to then leverage that and create growth create opportunity create benefit for people to use sure so when we started with ai you spoke about the uh variable medical devices so how has that market grown with the like since its inception i mean i'm sure initially we didn't see many smart watches on people's and now it's like i think one one out of two half i even half is a lesser thing everyone has that watches on their wrist so how would you say that that has helped in collecting the medical data or something no absolutely i i um it's it's not half it's it's uh it's it's it's it's less than that again i can pull up some exact specifics for the audience so that uh they know the uh exact number so uh in terms of value of the of the industry in 2020 it was a you a 40 billion dollar industry and that's expected to reach 48 billion by the end of this year so it's grown by 8 billion so there's almost a 20 growth in just one year alone in the industry that i work in primarily which is currently the white collar corporate workers as i shared a third of all of the 1 billion white collar workers around the world have some form of a digital wearable device and there's so many now you've got the large organizations like apple obviously google invested in fitbit you've got domain specific wearables like the aura ring the abbott libra patch which is the continuous glucose monitoring device uh whoop the american company which creates a band that measures your heart rate variability so what's really interesting for us as a platform is looking at all of the new uh devices which are being created and growing over the next few years so that is continuously creating information what we now need to do and healthcare providers should not be scared of this they should embrace this is how can we use this real-time information being created on our patients which will give us interesting insights into how we can improve their care now i know one of the biggest challenges right now is the volume of data right you have a patient come to you and they'll show you oh here's my six-month ecg data what the hell do i do with that how do i even sit through all of that and that's what we're doing that's what we're doing the intelligence at human edge is understanding which of the pain points which are the signals which are showcasing that there is something specifically and then let's deep dive into that signal and understand what now needs to be done for that particular patient so there will be increasing products and services that get created i think what we should do as healthcare providers in is encourage our patients to adopt these technologies so that ultimately we can benefit them by creating upstream behaviors and i always say as a doctor if there's a patient sitting in front of me that means the healthcare system has failed because 95 96 of cases are chronic in nature there's a very small percent which are acute road traffic accidents acute emergencies acute illnesses and infections most of the others can be prevented from even occurring in the first place and that's really our role as doctors it's not to treat the symptoms it's to prevent the disease we forget that in the process yeah right right uh so yeah that that i mean that's what i was thinking like i'm using the google feed i'll just see at the 10k steps and i'm done i don't think i have to go and see my heart rate and monitor it so is there any way like the doctor can if the patient is sitting right in front of him that he can ask for that data that do you use some healthcare i mean ethically as well or if is there any way that the patient can you know i don't know how should i say it that it can be connected to the doctor the doctor knows and like this is his heart rate while he's walking this is when it's normal so i think that would help in the help the doctor in the diagnosis a lot no absolutely those interoperability platforms are being created there are increasing number of direct to consumer mobile applications in india i'll give you an example another company that we work with is a company called ultra human and they're using the abbott cgm device to provide users diabetics and pre-diabetics with real-time glucose monitoring data cytosolic glucose monitoring data from the lab label to patch showing beautiful graphs and then an individual user can actually update their information and say when they ate what they ate when they exercised how much exercise were they stressed did they sleep badly etc and that intelligence is being collected and collected to hopefully provide these uh insights to their care providers which will be given to them dashboards uh so that's one company focused on one specific disease and then at the other end of the spectrum you have organizations like ours human edge which is really looking at all the different data points which will be coming in across different types of verticals and essentially creating a digital twin a digital avatar of the individual that lets you understand them and then create the right bio uh the great behavior right so like many chronic you said about the chronic diseases the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to chronic diseases is obesity yeah for obesity also now there are many metabolism tracking devices as well so how helpful would that be in actually judging the metabolism per se or the bmr ratio and to predict so as to prevent the chronic disease okay so there are a few metabolic tools available some of them are a stretch some of them have got very strong scientific validity so i recommend a continuous glucose monitoring device to everyone i talk to whether they're a diabetic pre-diabetic or someone like me who's like a weekend warrior just to understand how does my body respond to different foods how does it respond after i exercise a different sleep pattern stress levels etc i think those two to three weeks uh each patch lasts for two weeks so you can wear two patches four weeks you'll get a really interesting insight around yourself i think every and it's very it's it's relatively affordable um okay for people to do on the other spectrum you've got new devices which are now being marketed on on social media where you can sort of blow into them and they take an analysis of your breath looking at carbon dioxide levels and interpreting your metabolic rate or metabolic flexibility uh substrate utilization whether it's fat versus carbohydrate um i am still waiting to look at really interesting concrete data to prove the efficacy of these platforms i know they work in the lab setting i mean i've undergone many vo2 max tests in my performance life looking at anaerobic threshold looking at graphs where my co2 consumption overtakes oxygen utilization etc how those is now being replicated and miniaturized into these small devices i'm really excited to see what happens to those so you've got those through there you've got other devices i've got a digital wing device at home yeah which uses bio impedance technology to analyze my body composition i mean it's traditional and we understand how it works so it gives me muscle composition bone composition protein etc but also what it does is it calculates basic metabolic rate pmr and biological age again i think that's a little bit of a stretch to convert one into the other there's clearly algorithms there but the industry trend is moving in a positive direction and the more experiments the more data that's created the more robust the algorithms the more accepting we are as healthcare providers to utilize that the as i said rising tide will raise all the ports uh so that should be our goal and our objective as as healthcare providers true true like again because of the pandemic the one device that i think has reached homes is the oximeter absolutely just go and measure your o2 but then again it doesn't have the uh i think facility to take it on your laptop or something like how would you know the history yeah how much was the ode to and how it is i think other than manually writing it down um i i didn't i mean at least the device i have i didn't see anything where we can see the history of the past no no there are some devices i know the goki uh the new goki band which measures pulse of symmetry has a memory function so it charts that obviously the new apple watch the cd7 also measures oxygen levels and can chart that uh in the background as well um so it's getting there i mean it's getting there these are all experiments that need to happen but uh we're getting right yeah right so i think we can take a few questions we have quite a bit of questions over here absolutely can we say that artificial intelligence is one of the subsets of this significant digital revolution yeah absolutely it's one of the subsets that's i think i would look at augmented reality virtual reality i look at 3d printing i look at you know utilization of lab-based cellular formation cellular technologies crispr cas9 is a prime example of that uh then you have the utilization of computers and microchips which comes in the form of structured learning machine learning or nlp uh and then artificial intelligence so there are so many of these sub themes that it's important to appreciate that the question therefore is around the utilization of digital technologies and not just ai there's so many other things that can also benefit patients yeah right right one question we have from dr somashri harsha doctor is asking where can we start after the mbbs degree to learn the technology of ai uh are there any courses it can start beforehand i don't think it needs to begin after you graduate as a doctor and i think the great thing now with learning is it's been truly democratized right it's freely available to anyone the only thing you need is the commodity of time and the discipline of interest and it's available online through these moocs which are the massive online training platforms there are so many different courses and platforms there are also now universities and institutions which are creating courses specifically for healthcare professionals to enhance their knowledge of digital health and i.t etc so you know whether it's you want to do it formally or whether you want to do it informally everything is available to you i think the main thing is time and interest okay so i guess dr soma you can right away start studying and researching about ai by the time you graduate obviously you would be an expert in that and by that time i would say the field is going to increase by leaps and bounds no doubt about that uh so one more question by dr sindhuja how has ai impacted cgm what are the other ways we can use such bio variables yeah so in terms of the applicability of artificial intelligence towards digital biomarkers so going beyond cgm uh digital biomarkers i think we are reaching a stage where as the adoption of these devices exponentially increases the availability of that data in increases and then we can start to learn on those sets right right now we're still in the stage of acquiring data acquisition after that learning can happen and then appropriate techniques can be implemented how would the sleep trackers would be useful in the diagnosis like how like there are so many devices now that we see yeah like you sleep your mobile phone is also able to track your sleep yeah absolutely so there are different types of sleep tracking technologies the simplest the most rudimentary one is your mobile device which can even be in another room it doesn't even need to be in the same bedroom and it uses a very simple algorithm where what's the last time you touched your phone what's the first time you picked it up and what was the level of sound and light in between and it can create some sort of sleep score that's the base based layer of where we are uh then there are devices that you put next to your bed that is listening to the room the sound the light there are a vibration technologies there are other devices where it can actually sit under your mattress or on your mattress which is using gyroscopic technology vibrational technology to interpret how much movement is happening when you move when you're still and creating a ramp score and a non-rent store a deep sleep score and then all the way at the other end are these uh are the other types which is the aura ring uh which is you know a simple piece of jewelry that a user can wear which is which is measuring heart rate variability it's measuring sleep latency it's measuring deep sleep it's measuring ram and non-rem it's also measuring body temperature it's measuring level of skin hydration it's measuring uh uh what else is it measuring it's measuring heart rate resting heart rate and it's measuring pulse oximetry so that simple device is creating so much interestingly that's the latest version of the three uh which i'm waiting to get my hands on uh in the next month or so uh so you know it's really quite fascinating i think sleep is a really important domain for us as clinicians because i don't think we ask about it very often if you're if you're an endocrinologist if you're someone who's dealing with patients with metabolic disease diabetes one of the main questions you should be asking is qualitative sleep because it affects nocturnal hypoglycemia it affects nocturnal cortisol levels it affects your ability to create glucose and store glucose adrenaline effects etc so i think sleep is really important another aspect which is really important is resting heart rate we've already seen and you know we've been in conversation with stanford medicine and is a fantastic gentleman professor michael schneider whose clinically validated tool showed that the just using resting heart rate alone he was able to predict with 92 accuracy a patient's probability of developing symptomatic covet just on their resting heart rate up to 96 hours up to four days before the presentation of symptoms and that's only looking at changes in resting heart rate and the signal of an upward deviation from normal from normal baseline so there's so many simple things which we have access to but we're not using it to our advantage true i mean that's really amazing in especially in this pandemic if we are able to predict four days before it's so much i mean the spread can be controlled whereas it affects the physical parameters a lot no absolutely there are some established clinically validated tools available which utilizes data being created from ordinary mobile devices and extrapolating for anxiety score stress score bipolar disease schizophrenia severity all of these things so the entire spectrum of mental health and well-being can actually be triggered and captured and utilized through mobile data that's a fabulous company in the us again i know them very very well they call healthy rhythms and they do a lot of work in this space where just normal data being created for mobile devices are used to measure and track patients with mental health and well-being oh that's conditions so we have a question from dr ravi guru what's your view on diagnostic skill and error occurring in daily consultation it's it's of course a really important thing that we need to be very cognizant dogs um and sorry let me get rid of these questions here okay it's a very important thing that we need to be cognizant of but saying that over 90 percent of gp consultations the doctor doesn't even put their hand on the patient at all right and that's with all of you signing in uh as well so i think we also need to be really realistic in terms of what are we actually needing to put our hand on the patient for and can that be substituted in some way there are now devices available which can be given to a patient at their home that they can use i've seen it in real time that they hold it up to their chest and in real time on my airpods i can hear their breath sounds i can hear their heart sounds i can even see a digital trace of the heart sound so even if i'm not very good at interpreting a systolic ejection systolic murmur versus a pan-systolic murmur the graph will give me a beautiful digital visualization of that auscultation pattern there are devices that the patient can put into their ear themselves and we can look at the tympanic membrane so if it's a child that we're worried about otitis media or inner ear infection we can actually look at the bulge on the tympanic membrane uh we can look for the lack of shine etc uh we could the patients can measure their own temperature so there are so many uh commoditized digital devices which are now entering into the sphere that really our ability or our need to put our hand onto our patient is even going down and down now there will always be a role and i gave a ted talk on 2016 about the future of health looking at health in 2013 and my entire premise was the fact that the doctor-patient relationship is a sacred one built over tens of thousands of years and it is between two human beings and it is fundamentally constructed on trust so we need to design for trust in the applications that we built how are we communicating empathy in a teleconsultation what is the patient experience to augment that as a thing and i don't talk about ai as a substitution whilst i predict by 2013 90 of all teleconsultations will be done with a machine not with a doctor i'm not talking about ai from an uh from a substitution perspective i'm really looking at it from an augmentation perspective how does it free up your time as a healthcare provider to focus your energies on the patients that need you most how does it triage the information in a way that allows you to get at the clinical decision earlier and how does it make you more effective in the limited resources infrastructure and all the stuff we spoke about at the beginning of this talk true true i mean yeah this is one of the myths that has been going around in health care that will ai replace the doctors and it's true i mean no the empathy part the sympathy part the i cannot replace it's just a way to augment the practice save the time instead of going for the verbal history taking you have the charts right in front of you so it's going to be of great help to the doctors dr karthik would like to ask how will ai help surgeons and what is the future in it oh absolutely i'd written a piece on a book which became a bestseller in india called dear people with love from doctors and it was 50 doctors from around the country had written a short piece and um and and in it and even if people do are really interested in this gentleman seems to be so uh please do a look for the ted talk that i gave in 2016 that's it's under my name you can just google tedx uh dr marcus rani future of health and i speak very specifically around the role of robotic surgery and the augmentation of robotic surgery through artificial intelligence in helping surgeons improve their skill their diagnostic and the intervention as well so again i think like medicine uh the digital technologies have huge roles to play on on the search so so the next question is by dr prakash can ai be used only a screening tool or will it totally replace conventional diagnostics i would say to replace it augment i think we need to be really careful with the language we use it'll augment we're already seeing it ibm watson is already doing this in the space of oncology uh the number of tools which have been made available in the last 12 to 18 months looking at corvette screening uh by cough sounds through a mobile device uh by radiology images being taken by ct scans by x-ray devices etc all of this is being used to augment not replace uh it's already here it's only gonna get stronger and i think in the next five to six years i keep telling this i've got friends who i trained with 20 years ago in med school who are now radiology consultants microbiology pathologists and i keep telling them guys you need to watch your discipline because in a few years if you're not careful you may become extinct unless you start getting keeping up with times on technology and innovating along with it as well because that's the earliest thing to do and and you know again i opened my ted talk in the same thread i said i asked the question what is a doctor our role as a doctor is the ability to ask questions assimilate information run an algorithm in our head and then create a differential list and suggest interventions right that is essentially what a doctor does all of that can be done by a computer yes the difference being is that as human beings we can apply a level of compassion and empathy and care along with that that's the bedside manner that's the human to human interaction that's what we need to focus on so the first bit is already being solved for so visualizing or scanning lots of ct results and looking for masses space occupying lesions embolic changes etc that can be done by the machine we don't need the human being to do that they do that much better than us what we can then do how do we communicate that with the patient what is the plan that needs to be laid out for the particular patient how can we work with the technology to enhance the intervention for that patient to increase success and then how do we follow up with them at the back end so that's still a very important prominent role for us as clinicians and healthcare providers we just need to accept and adopt those technologies so that our care and ultimately therefore the probability of success which is really all we really care about is enhanced yeah true but like and this is like totally from my personal experience when i was like in the clinical field we have like india has a majority of patients where like you said the physician doesn't even touch on the contrary patients do feel like doctor neha gaya like they feel that you know the doctor has touched and checked it might be a simple just a stethoscope or something so how do you feel the patients who react to this that you know everything is done by the machine then what is the doctor doing this is the question i agree i think it's a behavior change i think uh and we saw that right 38 38 x increase in in tele consultations 85 percent of doctors now doing it 80 are first-time users two years ago nobody would go to their doctor for teleconsultation today people are literally dying and crying for a tele consultation because they can't get access to the physical doctor all of that will change you look at the airline industry the average flying time for a pilot physically managing the aircraft is less than seven percent 93 of the time the computer is flying the aeroplane yeah now would we get onto an aircraft with it without a human being at the front no nobody would want to do that right now but you look at what um jeff bezos has done with blue shepherd his latest rockets are going up into space without a single human pilot it's all being run by a computer so times are changing folks we need to stay with it and we need to make sure that our industry keeps pace with it otherwise we'll just be left behind yeah true coincidentally we had a session on our app right here a couple of days back what can healthcare learn from aviation and that's where we also had the same topic that when it comes to doctors you search for his history his experience and everything whereas by going by a flight you are least interested who the pilot is and how is going to fly whereas there's equal amount of risk at both the ends so the next question would be would using ai compromise on the clinical skills of physician by dr pooja no i don't think so i i don't think it's a compromise if handled correctly uh as i said we mustn't get lazy uh our job as biological beings if i take it to first principles is to continuously evolve evolutionary pressure creates survival of the fittest and we need to ensure and i assume therefore that's even why all 57 order of you have even signed in for this session is because you want to be part of that fittest cohort and so we need to evolve and keep pace and use it to our advantage all right so dr teja is asking what are the reasons for digitization being behind in health care as compared to other fields i think it's it's a it's a really fragmented complicated industry you've got multi-stakeholders with a misalignment on non-alignment in uh in incentives either financial incentives or success incentives you've got data privacy you've got data security you've got data bandwidth then you've got the way healthcare is designed which is very siloed so if i have chest pain today if i go to a cardiologist a gastroenterologist and a respiratory physician my differential diagnosis will be different right so let's also not kid ourselves the whole system is not designed to be in the the world that we currently inhabit a lot of change is required change means inertia to be overcome inertia means we need the right catalyst code and digitization is one of those catalysts so it will take time uh but uh step by step we shall get that yeah that's great so like when it comes to like we talked about prevention and all so are there any statistics that because of use of the digital therapy this is how the deaths have been prevented or there's a like disease prevention has been really good or something i i wouldn't have that data at hand or off the top of my head i i i'm sure it exists somewhere i just don't have the data set to to suggest that right now okay the next question is by dr harsh the field of space medicine is gaining a lot of traction in the western world how do you see ai playing a role in space medicine i mean i've been deeply fascinated so i mean i worked at nasa right on the human spaceflight program i'm still an advisor to them and the canadians uh on deep space uh nutrition i think there's so many applicabilities for technology in space i think the reality is that first crew that goes to mars sometime around 20 33 to 35 i can almost guarantee that out of the five people on board one of them will be a doctor i'm pretty sure it'll be a female physician and a female surgical physician so if you're listening to this and you're a young surgical resident and you're female and you'll enjoy space medicine you know you've got around 10 to 12 years to make sure you're on that aircraft and i think the probability of an indian being there is really high uh so you're the right you're the right demographic you're the you're in the right time in human history to be on board that space rocket uh to get there i think there's a lot of interesting stuff that will happen we can't kid ourselves there are huge challenges to overcome uh this is my book by the way so i'll just bring it up here at the human edge uh and there's a chapter dedicated to space travel in here chapter three talks about the physiology that needs to be overcome in order to send a human being to to mars and i talk in great detail around the the the adaptations which need to be acquired in the cardiovascular system in the vestibular ocular system in the musculoskeletal system uh as well as mental health challenges reproductive health all of the things so i go into great detail in there but you know generally speaking there are three big challenges there's the lack of gravity uh there is radiation uh and uh there is distance uh distance which creates delayed latency and communication of signals of time all of those things so lots of challenges but it's an incredibly exciting space pardon the pun and i hope i can participate in some way as well in the next few days well i'm sure dr harsh would be soon buying the copy of human edge doctor says she totally agrees with the fragmented part which you talked about dr prakash is asking can we use ai in medical school teaching we already are we already are in many instances i've seen a university i mean practically all education is now online by the way right uh so the edge tech sector has gone through a massive acceleration over the last couple of years so there's so many instances of personalized teaching computer layer teaching courses being made available etc uh you know augmented visual uh tools where surgeons can wear glasses and see screens come up so i think there's so many applications to this and i think that's one that's probably going to be the earliest change in our system in health where we see all of these applications in education first and then having this entire new generation of doctors nurses healthcare providers used to engaging in digital technologies and then extending into the into the operating theater into the consulting room into the hospitals etc right right so there's one more question and because it's from my field now even i am interested to listen can ai be used in dentistry part in space dentistry in space yeah i you i mean you can answer for dentistry on earth and then dentistry on space well i mean in terms of dentistry on earth i i've seen lots of digital health applications looking at scanning technology uh uh you know the um what is called those mouth shields uh mouth guards for correction of overbite uh dental straightening etcetera so there's that huge space then there's planning procedures which are happening i've seen applicability of stem cell utilization in tooth decay in recreating of of teeth at king's college london i read a really interesting study which is going on where they're looking at stem cell rejuvenation therapy for growing uh patient teeth and then implanting them back in so lots of lots of applicability lots of exciting stuff going on and i i i don't know much about dental in space to be honest but i'm sure there is some stuff being planned yeah there might be i'm just doing a time check because i know we're approaching 8 15. so last couple of questions yeah sure so like diabetes is said to be prevalent in india a lot it almost now it's known to be it's like an epidemic or something so how would you say ai would help in the pre-diabetic diagnosis and management 35 of people uh who are living in india are likely to be pre-diabetic so that's a huge population it's 300 million people plus yeah right and 90 of them so 217 million of them don't even know they're pre-driven right so the role of digital tools is paramount is critical in solving for the diabetes issue i mean myself i was a frontline uh medic in the first wave i was working in the slums in in mumbai and bmc as a bmc doctor for covet relief efforts i contracted the virus in august of last year i was sick for many months i had a multi-lover pneumonia i had a autoimmune generated myositis because of the virus i was put on heavy dose steroids for a long period of time and i became pre-diabetic now i'm a fit young guy i run full marathons uh you know i'm very careful about what i ate my hba1c uh crosstreaks i i've still got a hp a1c of 5.8 even you know a year later and i use the cgm technology to my advantage to try and understand what foods i can eat what i shouldn't eat how much i should exercise when i should exercise my sleep patterns when i travel so it's got a huge applicability beyond diabetes for pre-diabetes and also for people like myself who are weekend warriors and want to improve their metabolic flexibility their substrate utilization the utilization of fat versus carbohydrate uh intermittent fasting uh ketogenesis all these things which are really important for human longevity i think these devices are really really important so anyone listening out there please make sure you test yourself if you don't know how to do so you can get in touch with me my social media handle is at doc doc m and then my surname r a n n e y at dot m running and i'll be more than happy to tell you how i do it and share with you some of the best practices yeah so like the similar question i had when you said medicines were diagnosed medicines were prescribed in case of covariate i i myself have so many examples around me that because of covered medicines now the patients have become pre-diabetic so is there any way like dr viraj has also asked the database medicine dose comes at a cost devices analytic system so should it be mandatory for a physician to use digital data every time i think uh we should allow our we should again this is another little catchphrase that i i keep using to encourage people to understand let science lead let's make data centric decisions around protocols around interventions around efficacy because ultimately us is a science-based discipline right medicine is science based it should challenge the conventional wisdoms we should learn from it we should adapt our systems accordingly and not just make anecdotal uh choices and we saw a lot of that through covet right the use of hydroclicholiquin the use of ivor medicine the use of azithromycin uh etc it was a bane of mine and i kept going on every single platform and reminding doctors why are you using antibiotics for an antiviral what is the role of an uh or an anti-malarial etcetera and we've seen yeah huge explosions in antibiotic resistance on the back of this and we had health we had ministers of state uh ministers of of health state health ministers talking about prescribing antibiotics why the president of the us was talking about hydroxychloroquine what degree does donald trump have to talk about that and and the the the the misinformation pandemic which was created on the back of that so our own as clinicians should be and i'm glad i'm seeing all these likes come on for this talk our roles of clinicians should be to promote data led science and data led decisions to enhance the efficacy of care in society true true kovid came with i think more than data later science later it was symptomatic lead treatment decisions i mean so many antibiotics were prescribed i am sure after covert there are there is going to be a use a huge rise in the antibiotic resistance among people which might cause some other issues in the future no one knows how the cova drugs are going to affect that patient so right now we are just focusing on this symptomatic treatment let's hope this doesn't turn into something very serious uh there's one more question can ai be used to catch covet bombs as in at the travel spaces travel like the airports or the railway stations instead of going for an rt pcr and waiting for the reports yeah i think it can and perhaps this could be the last question because i know it's coming up to dinner time for a lot of people as well i think um what i mean look at temperature uh facial recognition software um uh you know people uh assuming covet inappropriate behaviors like coughing sneezing etc so you know that's where big data comes in that's where we need to have big data to look at big data sets to understand pattern recognitions apply rules test those rules and then create techniques on the back end so i think there's a there's a huge scope of that and i i know the chinese government is doing a lot of that uh uh specifically and for non-covet other ethically questionable usage of facial recognition as well right right true dr marcus thank you so much for and very interactive session on ai i'm sure there were lots of emojis appreciating the session we have lots of comments when everyone has appreciated that it's an excellent session and everyone was really looking forward that how ai can be used in healthcare we have all been just hearing about ai and especially after the pandemic yeah i'm sure many of them got their doubts cleared that how ai can be really used and how beneficial it is to the doctors i would like to thank you on behalf of team netflix i would also thank all the audience for attending today's session thank you all

BEING ATTENDED BY

Dr. Devakanta Medhi & 384 others

SPEAKERS

dr. Marcus Ranney

Dr. Marcus Ranney

Founder and CEO - Human Edge

+ Details
dr. Marcus Ranney

Dr. Marcus Ranney

Founder and CEO - Human Edge

+ Details

About Medflix

Medflix is a new platform by PlexusMD, India's most active and trusted doctor community. On Medflix, you can discover live surgeries, discussions, conferences and courses from some of the top doctors and institutions across the world. Join clubs in your areas of interest and access hundreds of amazing live discussions everyday.